You are at:

'Junk DNA' Made Visible Before the Final Cut

Research findings from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are shining a light on an important regulatory role performed by the so-called dark matter, or "junk DNA," within each of our genes. The new study reveals snippets of information contained in dark matter that can alter the way a gene is assembled. "These small sequences of genetic information tell the gene how to splice, either by enhancing the splicing process or inhibiting it. The research opens the door for studying the dark matter of genes. And it helps us further understand how mutations or polymorphisms affect the functions of any gene," said study senior author, Zefeng Wang, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.Science Daily - Jan. 7, 2013
Yang Wang, et al.
A complex network of factors with overlapping affinities represses splicing through intronic elements.
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 2012; 20 (1): 36 DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.2459


Comments (3)
See Older Posts...
 You are at: